Jul
18
6:00 PM18:00

An Atlas of Commoning Salon Series: Neither Public, Nor Private - Miller ICA

An Atlas of Commoning_Pittsburgh_poster_reduced.jpg

An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

SALON SERIES: NEITHER PUBLIC, NOR PRIVATE
Thursday 18 July | 6:00-8:00pm
Facilitator: Dana Bishop-Root
Supported by The Heinz Endowments

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

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Jul
27
12:00 PM12:00

An Atlas of Commoning Curator's Tour - Miller ICA

An Atlas of Commoning_Pittsburgh_poster_reduced.jpg

An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

CURATOR’S TOURS
Saturday 27 July | 12:00-1:00pm
Saturday 24 August | 12:00-1:00pm
Saturday 21 September | 12:00-1:00pm

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

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Aug
13
3:00 PM15:00

Tools for Specifying Healthier Regional Building Materials (GBA Event)

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Tools for Specifying Healthier Regional Building Materials

August 13 @ 3:00 pm - 6:00 pm EDT

About this Event 

When specifying building materials for healthy and high-performing building projects, team members often face dizzying trade-offs. How can you find materials with a low environmental footprint, no negative health impacts, and which also contribute to ongoing building performance? Material selection can prevent projects from meeting standards like LEED v4, Living Building Challenge and WELL. At this event, you’ll gain insight into better sourcing strategies, in addition to learning about some of the most exciting product innovations in the building sector.  

Learning Objectives:

  1. Participants will discuss decision-making obstacles when determining between healthy and regional products.

  2. Participants will discuss common challenges in healthy and regional building product selection.

  3. Participants will explore labels and tools that can help make specifying products easier.

  4. Participants will hear from project team members and product representatives to gain insight into different strategies for product selection.

 

Health in the Built Environment Series 

GBA’s series on Health in the Built Environment will prepare owners and practitioners to build spaces that prioritize occupant health and productivity. The series connects research in neuroscience and cognitive behavior with building design and maintenance, proposing practical solutions to improve tenant well-being. 

You can choose to attend one event in the series, or dive deeper into the topic by attending all four events. Members of GBA have the opportunity to purchase the whole series at a deep discount.  

This event is pending approval for 2.0 GBCI CEUs and 2.0 AIA HSW hours.

View Event →
Aug
24
12:00 PM12:00

An Atlas of Commoning Curator's Tour - Miller ICA

An Atlas of Commoning_Pittsburgh_poster_reduced.jpg

An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

CURATOR’S TOURS
Saturday 27 July | 12:00-1:00pm
Saturday 24 August | 12:00-1:00pm
Saturday 21 September | 12:00-1:00pm

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

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Sep
16
to Sep 18

Technical Opportunities Conference - Wiegand Gymnasium, CUC

  • Wiegand Gymnasium, Cohon University Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
toc.jpg

For more than 40 years, the Technical Opportunities Conference has been the largest job fair on Carnegie Mellon's campus, focusing specifically on technical employment. 

The TOC offers a great opportunity for companies and potential employees to make connections for both full-time and summer employment.

More information on the CMU website.

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Sep
16
5:00 PM17:00

Lecture Series: Kathryn H. Anthony - Kresge Theatre

KATHRYN H. ANTHONY, PHD
ACSA DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

Defined by Design: The Surprising Power of Hidden Gender, Age, and Body Bias in Everyday Products and Places
M 16 Sep | 5:00pm | Kresge Theatre
Alan H Rider Distinguished Lecture
cosponsored by the CMU School of Design

View Event →
Sep
19
to Sep 21

An Atlas of Commoning Symposium: Designing for a Commons Transition - Miller ICA

An Atlas of Commoning_Pittsburgh_poster_reduced.jpg

An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

SYMPOSIUM: DESIGNING FOR A COMMONS TRANSITION
Thursday 19 - Saturday 21 September
A forum for exchange between local and international practices of commoning.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

View Event →
Sep
21
12:00 PM12:00

An Atlas of Commoning Curator's Tour - Miller ICA

An Atlas of Commoning_Pittsburgh_poster_reduced.jpg

An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

CURATOR’S TOURS
Saturday 27 July | 12:00-1:00pm
Saturday 24 August | 12:00-1:00pm
Saturday 21 September | 12:00-1:00pm

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

View Event →
Sep
21
12:00 PM12:00

An Atlas of Commoning Site Visits to Local Projects

An Atlas of Commoning_Pittsburgh_poster_reduced.jpg

An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

SITE VISITS TO LOCAL PROJECTS
Saturday 21 September | 12:00pm

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

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Oct
24
10:30 AM10:30

Spark: Startups and Emerging Companies - Rangos Ballroom, CUC

  • Rangos Ballroom, 2nd Floor, Cohon University Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Spark.png

Spark: Startups and Emerging Companies is an innovative career event designed to provide a platform for small business and early stage start-ups to engage Carnegie Mellon University students and alumni. Companies will be afforded the opportunity to network with, and recruit our students and alumni, as well as share information about their company story, mission, and/or products with all in attendance. Spark is presented in collaboration with CMU’s Swartz Center For Entrepreneurship.

More information on the CMU website.

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Nov
7
to Nov 9

wats:ON 2019: NOW.

  • CMU School of Architecture (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
watsON 2019.png

wats:ON 2019: NOW.

The wats:ON Festival is an interdisciplinary arts festival, bringing an eclectic and diverse range of internationally acclaimed and emerging artists and their work to Carnegie Mellon University. 

NOW. takes on the spirit of Activism, with artists and work tapping into the zeitgeist of our current climate to redirect culture.

07-08-09 November

www.watsonfestival.org

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Jun
29
5:30 PM17:30

An Atlas of Commoning Opening Reception - Miller ICA

An Atlas of Commoning_Pittsburgh_poster_reduced.jpg

An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

OPENING RECEPTION
Saturday, 29 June 2019 | 5:30-7:30pm
RSVP on Facebook

Join us for the exhibition opening of An Atlas of Commoning on Saturday 29 June at the Miller ICA on the CMU campus.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

View Event →
Jun
29
1:00 PM13:00

Open Space Workshop: Commoning Pittsburgh - Miller ICA

An Atlas of Commoning_Pittsburgh_poster_reduced.jpg

An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

OPEN SPACE WORKSHOP: COMMONING PITTSBURGH
Saturday, 29 June 2019 | 1:00-5:30pm
RSVP on EventBrite

The Open Space workshop, preceding the exhibition opening of An Atlas of Commoning, brings together community-led initiatives for building meaningful relations between people, places, and the environment in the pursuit of a more just and resilient Pittsburgh. The workshop provides a platform for the exchange of ideas, experiences and knowledge, and marks the beginning of a summer-long conversation around practices of commoning. Join us in building a network of initiatives that propose another possible world, and one which is already in the making.

For more information please contact Stefan Gruber at smgruber@andrew.cmu.edu.

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

View Event →
Jun
7
6:00 PM18:00

AIA PA Alumni & Fellows Reception at A'19 in Las Vegas

Fellows-Slider-2019.png

You're invited to join the School of Architecture on Friday, 07 June 2019 for the annual AIA Pennsylvania Alumni and Fellows Reception during the AIA Conference on Architecture in Las Vegas. Catch up with former classmates and professors, and meet this year's class of AIA Fellows from the Keystone State. More information and RSVP below.

AIA Pennsylvania Alumni and Fellows Reception at A'19
Wynn Las Vegas, Mouton 2 Room
3131 S Las Vegas Blvd 
Las Vegas, NV 89109

Friday, 07 June 2019 | 6:00-8:00pm (drop-ins welcome)

Join AIA Pennsylvania, CMU SoA, and the Temple Tyler School of Art as we honor the newly inducted class of 2019 Fellows from Pennsylvania and celebrate Pennsylvania’s NAAB accredited schools of architecture at the AIA Conference on Architecture in Las Vegas.

Alumni of Pennsylvania’s 7 NAAB accredited architecture institutions are invited to join us to network and celebrate at A’19. Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture is proud to be the NAAB school partner for this event.

We kindly ask that you RSVP at the link below by Monday, June 3. 

We are also pleased to announce that this year’s class of AIA Fellows from Pennsylvania includes CMU alumnus and adjunct faculty member Christine Mondor, FAIA, LEED AP. Join us in congratulating Christine on this honor.

We look forward to seeing you in Las Vegas during A'19!

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May
19
11:00 AM11:00

CMU Commencement Ceremony - Gesling Stadium

CMU Commencement Ceremony

Gesling Stadium
Sun 19 May 2019 | 11:00am-12:30pm

9:00am | Gesling Stadium Opens
Gesling Stadium
Gesling Stadium opens to guests at 9:00am.

10:00am | Robing 
Robing for all commencement ceremony participants occurs at various locations on campus. Robing is for all graduates and ceremony participants only. Guests should proceed directly to the stadium.

10:15am | Guests Seated for Ceremony
Gesling Stadium
All guests must be seated by 10:15am for the procession of graduates into Gesling Stadium.

11:00am | CMU Commencement Ceremony
Gesling Stadium
All graduating students at CMU will be celebrated during the University-wide Commencement Ceremony. The ceremony begins with the procession of graduates and will include addresses from the student speaker and keynote speaker, as well as a charge from the president of the university. Tickets are not required for this event and there is no limit on the number of guests a student may bring, however seating is first come first served. The ceremony takes place outdoors in Gesling Stadium, rain or shine! The stadium is NOT covered and there is no shade. An indoor simulcast and a webcast will be available for those who wish to be seated indoors.

View Event →
May
18
4:30 PM16:30

Doctor’s Hooding Ceremony - Carnegie Music Hall, Carnegie Museum

  • Carnegie Music Hall, Carnegie Museum (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Doctor’s Hooding Ceremony

Carnegie Music Hall, Carnegie Museum, 4400 Forbes Avenue (off campus)
Sat 18 May 2019 | 4:30-6:30pm

3:30pm | Robing
Carnegie Music Hall Foyer, Carnegie Museum
Robing is for doctor's candidates and faculty hooders only. Guests should proceed directly to the ceremony.

3:30pm | Doors Open for Hooding Ceremony
Carnegie Music Hall, Carnegie Museum
Doors to the Carnegie Music Hall open for guests at 3:30pm for the Doctor's Hooding Ceremony. Please do not arrive prior to this time.

4:30pm | Doctor's Hooding Ceremony
Carnegie Music Hall, Carnegie Museum
At this ceremony, all CMU PhD graduates will be individually hooded and recognized. Tickets are not required for this event and there is no limit on the number of guests a student may bring, however seating is first come first served.

6:00pm | Ceremony Reception
Carnegie Music Hall Foyer, Carnegie Museum
Immediately following the Doctor's Hooding Ceremony, a reception will be held in the Carnegie Music Hall Foyer.

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May
18
11:30 AM11:30

School of Architecture Diploma Ceremony & Reception - Chosky Theater / CFA Great Hall

School of Architecture Diploma Ceremony & Reception

Chosky Theater (Ceremony) & CFA Great Hall (Reception)
Sat 18 May 2019 | 11:00am-2:00pm

10:30am | Graduates Assemble for Diploma Ceremony
Chosky Theater, Purnell Center
All graduating students report to the second floor lobby of Chosky Theater to prepare for the SoA diploma ceremony. Please arrive dressed for the diploma ceremony in your caps, gowns, cords, etc.

11:00am | Doors Open for Diploma Ceremony
Chosky Theater, Purnell Center
Doors to Chosky Theater open for guests at approximately 11:00am for the SoA Diploma Ceremony. Please no food, drinks, or pets in Chosky Theater.

11:30am | School of Architecture Diploma Ceremony
Chosky Theater, Purnell Center
All undergraduate and graduate students will be recognized during the SoA Diploma Ceremony. Tickets are not required to attend the event.

1:30pm | School of Architecture Reception
CFA Great Hall
Immediately following the School of Architecture Diploma Ceremony, a reception will be held for students and their families to enjoy food and drinks in the CFA Great Hall.

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May
18
9:00 AM09:00

CFA Honors Ceremony & Reception - Chosky Theater

College of Fine Arts Honors Ceremony & Reception

Chosky Theater
Sat 18 May 2019 | 9:00am-10:30am

9:00am | College of Fine Arts Honors Ceremony
Chosky Theater, Purnell Center
Undergraduate students receiving university and/or college honors will be recognized during the CFA Honors Ceremony. Graduates will be presented with honors medallions and cords, which should be worn during the SoA Diploma Ceremony on Saturday and CMU Commencement Ceremony on Sunday. Families and guests are encouraged to attend. Graduates are not required to wear caps and gowns for this event.

10:00am | College of Fine Arts Honors Reception
Purnell Center Lobby
Immediately following the CFA Honors Ceremony, a reception will be held in the Chosky Theater.

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May
17
6:30 PM18:30

CMU Alumni Awards - Kresge Theatre

cmu alumni awards.png

The Carnegie Mellon University Alumni Association invites you to celebrate the 69th Annual CMU Alumni Awards honoring the accomplishments and dedicated service of our alumni.

CMU Alumni Awards
Friday, May 17, 2019
Doors open: 5:30pm
Award Ceremony: 6:30pm

Kresge Theatre
College of Fine Arts

Dinner reception to follow

Join us to celebrate the alumni who have defined their industries and served their alumni communities and Carnegie Mellon. The evening will feature an awards ceremony, entertainment from CMU student performers, tapas-style dinner and drinks, and a chance to network with alumni and university leaders.

Business attire 

RSVP on the Alumni Awards website, and learn more about the 2019 honorees and event, as well as tribute ad and sponsorship details.

Questions? Contact alumni-awards@andrew.cmu.edu or 412-268-8089.

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May
15
12:00 PM12:00

Jonathan Foley, Project Drawdown Executive Director Seminar - Scott Hall

  • Marquis Conference Room, Scott Hall 5201 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Please join the Scott Institute for Energy Innovation for a seminar by Jonathan Foley, a national leader in science communication and executive director of Project Drawdown (the most comprehensive plan ever proposed to reverse global warming).

DATE: Wednesday, May 15, 2019
TIME: 12:00-1:20 PM
SPEAKER: Jonathan Foley, Project Drawdown Executive Director
LOCATION: Marquis Conference Room, Scott Hall 5201

Lunch will be available at 11:45 a.m. 

REGISTER


BIOGRAPHY:
Dr. Jonathan Foley is a world-renowned environmental scientist, sustainability expert, author, and public speaker. His work is focused on understanding our changing planet, and finding new solutions to sustain the climate, ecosystems, and natural resources we all depend on.

Foley’s groundbreaking research and insights have led him to become a trusted advisor to governments, foundations, non-governmental organizations, and business leaders around the world. He and his colleagues have made major contributions to our understanding of global ecosystems, food security and the environment, climate change, and the sustainability of the world’s resources.

He has published over 130 peer-reviewed scientific articles, including many highly cited works in Science, Nature, and the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. In 2014, Thomson Reuters named him a Highly Cited Researcher in ecology and environmental science, placing him among the top 1 percent most cited global scientists. Read more.

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May
13
10:30 AM10:30

PhD-CD Proposal Presentation: Noreen Saeed - MMCH 121

  • CMU School of Architecture - MMCH 121 (map)
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A Computational Approach to Predicting Thermal Conductivity
Proposal by Noreen Saeed, PhD-CD Candidate

Monday, 13 May 2019 | 10:30am-12:30pm
MMCH 121

Advisory Committee:

  • Ramesh Krishnamurti (Chair), Professor, Computational Design, School of Architecture, CMU

  • Jonathan A. Malen, Professor Mechanical Engineering, CMU

  • Chris Harrison, Assistant Professor, Human Computer Interaction Institute, CMU


Abstract:
The work documented here pertains to the study of material properties, how they interrelate, and how these relationships can be exploited to assess the building fabric. This work lays out the foundations for a thesis proposal, stemming from my interest in sustainable design and from a need for tools that enable green building design and evaluation. The specific material property addressed in this project is thermal conductivity. A building’s thermal properties are key to predicting its performance, and energy consumption. For new buildings, thermal properties are used in determining its certification such as LEED etc. For older buildings, evaluation of thermal properties offers a useful insight into how much insulation to add, and to predictions of energy consumption. However, physically establishing the thermal conductivity of a building’s external walls is difficult and is often a time-consuming process. This proposal explores ways to use machine learning techniques for predicting the thermal properties of materials. It proposes a method to make this estimation by learning from quicker and easier to measure material properties such as dielectric properties and sound properties and establish their correlation with thermal conductivity.

The complete proposal document is available here:
https://cmu.box.com/s/5vff4x3fd5f4jeiwpznmhzchv3fc64u9

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May
8
4:30 PM16:30

CFA Faculty Research Mixer - STUDIO / CFA 111

Please join us for the second CFA Research Community Mixer. Gather over food and drink for a "conversation café" event to talk about your research and creativity ideas and meet like-minded people within CFA. If you’d like to share your work, you can do so in smaller conversations as people move from table to table — or just come for food, drink, and conversation.

The event is open to all CFA faculty. Refreshments will be served. We hope to see you there!

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May
8
8:30 AM08:30

Meeting of the Minds - Undergraduate Research Symposium - CUC

The Undergraduate Research Symposium, or the "Meeting of the Minds," is a university-wide celebration of undergraduate research. All Carnegie Mellon undergrads engaged in research and creative projects are encouraged to apply!

What is it?

The "Meeting of the Minds" is a great opportunity to share your research with the entire campus community. All research projects are welcome - you don't have to be working on a SURG project to present. You can give an oral presentation on your project, design a poster, display your art, or give a live performance. Those with a more competitive streak can also register for one of the Special Competitions and compete for cash prizes!

When is it?

The 2019 Meeting of the Minds will be held Wednesday, May 8, 2019 (reading day during finals).

How can I participate?

As a group or as an individual, with a poster, a series of paintings, or an opera -- the choice is yours. All you have to do is register, provide an abstract, and prepare your presentation. We'll assign you a presentation time (between 10 AM and 5 PM) and room in the University Center.

How do I register?

Please Register here by April 9, 2019.  Once you authenticate through the Web ISO system, you will be taken to your student profile (if you have registered with the URO in the past) or to a student registration screen where you should enter your personal information.  Then, click on "add project" to add your symposium presentation.  The Project Type will be "Symposium Only."

Please note:  All faculty advisors and students on group projects must be added by the student initiating the project registration.  You MUST use their ANDREW ID to enter those individuals.  ID exchanges will not enable you to apply (i.e. cmu.edu; cmu.cs.edu; cmu.sei.cmu; cmu.ece.edu, etc.)  Use of the online application requires WebISO authentication for each applicant.

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May
7
6:00 PM18:00

EX-CHANGE Reception

exchange-GIF1-2019.gif

The Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture invites you to join us for the 2019 EX-CHANGE year-end show celebrating the work of the SoA from 1st year to PhD. 

Events take place in the College of Fine Arts Building in Room 200 (studio), Room 214, and the CFA Great Hall. More information available at soa.cmu.edu/exchange.

This year's event curated by faculty members Sarah Rafson and Akhil Badjatia.

2019 EX-CHANGE

Reception
Tuesday 07 May | 6:00-9:00pm

On View
Monday 06 May - Tuesday 07 May, 2019


EX-CHANGE is a year-end show and publication celebrating the work of the SoA from 1st year to PhD. Inaugurated in fall 2017, EX-CHANGE is an ongoing opportunity to shine new light on the SoA programs and position the work within larger questions of research and practice.

Read more at 
soa.cmu.edu/exchange.

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May
7
12:00 PM12:00

PhD-BPD Proposal Presentation: Surekha Tetali - MMCH 415 IW

  • CMU School of Architecture - MMCH 415 IW Large Conference Room (map)
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Interplay between built environment factors and Urban Heat Island phenomenon in India and the United States
Proposal by Surekha Tetali, PhD-BPD Candidate

Tuesday, 07 May 2019 | 12:00-2:00pm
MMCH 415 IW Large Conference Room

Advisory Committee:
Volker Hartkopf, Professor, School of Architecture, Chair
Nina Baird, Professor, School of Architecture
Kelly Klima, Engineer, Rand Corporation

Abstract:
Urban Heat Island (UHI) phenomenon is defined as higher urban temperatures compared to the rural surroundings. UHI phenomenon impacts building energy consumption, thermal comfort, air quality, and the overall human well-being in urban areas. Increased heat due to urbanization is a key cause of UHI phenomenon. While, the impact of UHI on building energy consumption has been well studied, a comprehensive understanding of the role of buildings and urban built environment in formation of the UHI has not reached the same level of maturity. Research on if and how the built environment interacts with UHI phenomenon at different spatial and temporal scales is scant, especially in a building scientist’s perspective. Further, research on UHI is predominantly focused towards temperate countries of North America and Europe. However, in hot and dense (sub) tropical country like India, UHI research is still in its infancy. Increasing temperatures and rapid urbanization in India show the immediate need for UHI research in India.

This research proposes to analyze the interplay between the natural and built environmental factors influencing the UHI phenomenon across some of the highly populated Indian urban regions and compare it with urban regions of the United States. UHI magnitude can be quantified as the difference between urban and rural land surface temperatures (LST) or canopy air temperatures. UHI quantified using LST is referred to as surface UHI (SUHI) and canopy air temperature as canopy UHI (CUHI). SUHI and CUHI are two different types of UHI that directly interact with buildings and built environment. Using a multi-method approach this study proposes to analyze both SUHI and CUHI across different locations in India and the US to identify any existing correlation between them, and the factors influencing their formation. In the first method, SUHI magnitude and the factors influencing it will be estimated using remote sensing data. Though this method calculates LST at a specific time of day, it is specifically useful in drawing comparisons across cities and for correlating the urban and rural surface properties (including building roofs) with LST and SUHI formation. This method, however, is incapable of isolating the individual building systems and their influence on UHI. Thus, in the second method, this research proposes to conduct simulations using an urban canopy model (UCM) to study the sensitivity of CUHI to the factors influencing its formation. Specifically, the energy interplay between buildings and canopy UHI will be quantified. Sensitivity study of multiple factors such as heat rejection through buildings, roof albedo, wall surface properties, building material, urban density, height/width ratio that can potentially impact the outside air temperatures will be performed using a UCM. Further, SUHI analysis would be used as a basis for developing urban design-related input parameters for the UCM. Surface temperatures from the SUHI analysis will be correlated with the temperatures from CUHI simulations to identify the correlation between surface and canopy UHI, and this could further serve as a validation of the UCM used – both of which are missing in Indian context. Some of the important expected outcomes of this research are: 1.) a list of urban natural and built environment related factors that influence UHI formation, 2.) potential mitigation measures for UHI at different scales and locations, 3.) a correlation between SUHI and CUHI in Indian context, 4). a quantitative and qualitative analysis of the hotspots and cool spots across India, and 5.) a correlation between building energy use intensity and UHI magnitude. On a whole this study is expected to quantify building design changes that could mitigate UHI and what they mean in terms of building energy performance.

UHI related policy makers, and code and standard development organizations are expected to benefit from the outcome of this research. Currently, the most commonly prescribed UHI mitigation measures across the globe are increased vegetation and high roof albedos. The proposed research can validate these recommendations for different Indian locations (climate, population and biophysical characteristics) and propose more localized measures. The list of UHI mitigation measures that can be formulated from this research can be implemented as local bylaws by the policy makers and local governments. Implementation of UHI mitigation measures could have an immediate impact on indoor and outdoor comfort and air quality, and on building energy consumption. On a broader scale, UHI mitigation measures translate into reduced greenhouse gas emissions and mitigation of climate change. Further, this research is expected to be the first of its kind in the Indian context, especially through application of an urban canopy model for Indian urban regions, and for its multi-method approach of UHI analysis. As such, it will serve as a stepping stone for more such research for a country that is expected to be the biggest contributor of urban growth in next 30 years. 

The complete proposal document is available here:
https://cmu.box.com/s/c8hm3357dmymny3gef5oh2cbfaxgm9y7

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May
7
10:00 AM10:00

Birth Rights ASO Studio Final Review - MMCH 303

  • CMU School of Architecture - MMCH 303 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
S19 FINAL REVIEWS W (1).gif

Join us for the Spring 2019 Final Reviews in the School of Architecture, Wednesday 01 May through Tuesday 07 May in conjunction with the EX-CHANGE year end show.


Monday, 06 May 2019

11:30am-3:30pm
Birth Rights: Connecting the Built Environment to Maternal and Infant Care in Vulnerable Populations in Pittsburgh (Rantilla ASOS), MMCH 303

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May
6
1:30 PM13:30

Low Relief ASO Studio Final Review - dFAB Lab

S19 FINAL REVIEWS 2.gif

Join us for the Spring 2019 Final Reviews in the School of Architecture, Wednesday 01 May through Tuesday 07 May in conjunction with the EX-CHANGE year end show.


Monday, 06 May 2019

1:30-4:30pm
Low Relief: virtual+material cultures of architectural deceit (Bard+Torello ASOS), dFAB Lab
Guests: Mine Ozkar, Heather Bizon

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May
6
1:00 PM13:00

Acupuncture Urbanism Final Review - MMCH 303

S19 FINAL REVIEWS 2.gif

Join us for the Spring 2019 Final Reviews in the School of Architecture, Wednesday 01 May through Tuesday 07 May in conjunction with the EX-CHANGE year end show.


Monday, 06 May 2019

1:00-3:00pm
Acupuncture Urbanism - Collaboratory Studio Pittsburgh (Gruber ASOS), MMCH 303
External Guest Critics: Lorena Bello, MIT ; Christine Brill, Studio for Spatial Practice; Ray Gastil, City Planning Pittsburgh; Kristin Hughes, CMU School of Design; Brent D. Ryan, MIT; Liu Jian, Tsinghua University

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