Sep
19
6:00 PM18:00

High Water Marks: Reimagining the Urban Waterfront - Troy, NY

Ray Gastil, Director of the Remaking Cities Institute, will speak at the inaugural Garage Talks event hosted by the Troy Innovation Garage. The event, “High Water Marks: Reimagining the Urban Waterfront,” takes place on Thursday 19 September from 6:00-8:00pm at the Troy Innovation Garage in Troy, New York.

Garage Talks is a dynamic new series of keynote lectures and masterclasses exploring issues of cities, design, and climate change.

Tickets for the event are available here.

About this Event

FUTURE OF SMALL CITIES. Season 1: Garage Talks is a dynamic new series of keynote lectures and masterclasses that will explore issues of urbanism, community, and climate change.

The inaugural Garage Talk event will be focused on the city and its waterfront. After years of neglecting their waterfronts, post-industrial cities across the country are finally realizing the value of clean, accessible, vibrant waterways. But who makes the decisions about how a waterfront should be used and what it will look like? In this event we will hear from Ray Gastil, former City Planner of Pittsburgh and current Director of the Remaking Cities Institute, about the journey of Pittsburgh's waterfront, as it has transformed from a river on fire to the heart of a revitalized downtown. Several local panelists will discuss the challenges and opportunities embodied within the Capital region’s own relationship to the Hudson River.

Speaker: 

Ray Gastil, Director of the Remaking Cities Institute at Carnegie Mellon University

Panelists:

Scott Townsend, Founding Architect, 3t Architects

Michael Finewood, Assistant Professor of Environmental Studies, Pace University

Kristin Diotte, Director of Planning and Development for City of Schenectady

Garage Talks is a series of five events, hosted by the Troy Innovation Garage, that will take place from September 2019 - May 2020. Each event feature a nationally-recognized speaker presenting case studies of urban problem solving in action. The Garage Talk series will culminate in a forum around public art in cities and produce a visually-rich publication documenting the yearlong conversation.

An accompanying series of masterclasses for a select group will extend and deepen the conversation and lead to possible policy suggestions.

Reif Larsen, the 2019-2020 Writer-in-Residence at the Troy Innovation Garage, will host the Garage Talks series. 

Beverages and food will be available at the program.

www.futureofsmallcities.com

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Sep
19
to Sep 21

Symposium: Designing for a Commons Transition - CMU

  • Carnegie Mellon University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Designing for a Commons Transition_symposium_poster_web.jpg

SYMPOSIUM: DESIGNING FOR A COMMONS TRANSITION
Thursday 19 - Saturday 21 September

This event is made possible through the generous support the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry and the Sylvia and David Steiner Lecture Series, the Carnegie Mellon University and ifa (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen).

Against the backdrop of the escalating climate crisis, social inequity and political polarization, the growing realization that neither the government nor the market can enable even access to resources and opportunities is leading citizens the world over to take matters into their own hands, self-organizing by pooling resources and claiming their collective right to the city. The creative insights emerging from these practices of commoning offer an entry point for refuting the neoliberal mantra “there is no alternative,” and spurring the imagination of another possible world. What impact can commoning have on the bottom-up transformation of cities? And what agency do designers have in contributing to such commons transition?

The symposium at Carnegie Mellon University brings together diverse perspectives exploring the role and responsibility of architecture and urban design in the struggle for more pluralistic, radically democratic and just cities. At a time of Pittsburgh’s renewed growth, the commons perspective urges us to revisit the city's community design legacy, and explore how it might be reinvigorated in the face of rising inequity. The event accompanies the international premier of the ifa-exhibition An Atlas of Commoning in collaboration with ARCH+ and the CMU School of Architecture on display at the Miller ICA.

Speakers include Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman, Renée Tribble, Kristin Hughes and Mary-Lou Arscott, Tobias Armborst, Antje Steinmuller, Karen Abrams, Anne-Marie Lubenau, Terri Baltimore, Stefani Danes and Christina Howell. Organized and curated by Stefan Gruber and Jonathan Kline.


PROGRAM

Thursday, September 19 | Kresge Theater, CMU College of Fine Arts

18:30 Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman: Unwalling Citizenship

Sylvia and David Steiner Lecture Series in Creative Inquiry in collaboration with the CMU School of Architecture lecture series

Friday, September 20 | CMU College of Fine Arts, Room 214

9:00 Welcome and Introductions

9:20 Renée Tribble, Planbude Hamburg
9:50 Kristin Hughes & Mary-Lou Arscott, Latham Street Commons
10:20 Tobias Armborst, Interboro Brooklyn

10:50 Coffee Break

11:10 Antje Steinmuller, CCA Urban Works Agency, San Francisco
11:50 Karen Abrams, The Heinz Endowments
12:20 Discussion on the role and agency of design in commoning the city with Tobias Armborst, Renée Tribble, Kristin Hughes & Mary-Lou Arscott, Antje Steinmuller and Karen Abrams facilitated by Stefan Gruber

13:00 Lunch Break

14:00 Mathias Heyden, ISPARA Berlin
14:45 Anne-Marie Lubenau, Bruner Foundation Cambridge
15:15-16:30 Panel discussion on the past and possible future of community design in Pittsburgh with Terri Baltimore, Stefani Danes, Christina Howell, Anne-Marie Lubenau and Mathias Heyden facilitated by Jonathan Kline

Saturday, September 21 | Miller ICA

11:00-12:30 Curator and Artist’s Tour of An Atlas of Commoning at Miller ICA

12:30-3:30 Bus Tour to Food Co-op (with option to buy lunch), Construction Junction, Center for Creative Reuse, and Community Forge. Tours and discussions with Francis Carter and Kate Safin, Mike Gable, Patrick Cooper.

Please RSVP for the bus tour as seats are limited. Students are strongly encouraged to attend.

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Sep
21
11:00 AM11:00

An Atlas of Commoning Curator and Artist’s Tour - Miller ICA

Designing for a Commons Transition_symposium_poster_web.jpg

SYMPOSIUM: DESIGNING FOR A COMMONS TRANSITION

Saturday, September 21 | Miller ICA

11:00-12:30 Curator and Artist’s Tour of An Atlas of Commoning at Miller ICA

This event is made possible through the generous support the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry and the Sylvia and David Steiner Lecture Series, the Carnegie Mellon University and ifa (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen).

Against the backdrop of the escalating climate crisis, social inequity and political polarization, the growing realization that neither the government nor the market can enable even access to resources and opportunities is leading citizens the world over to take matters into their own hands, self-organizing by pooling resources and claiming their collective right to the city. The creative insights emerging from these practices of commoning offer an entry point for refuting the neoliberal mantra “there is no alternative,” and spurring the imagination of another possible world. What impact can commoning have on the bottom-up transformation of cities? And what agency do designers have in contributing to such commons transition?

The symposium at Carnegie Mellon University brings together diverse perspectives exploring the role and responsibility of architecture and urban design in the struggle for more pluralistic, radically democratic and just cities. At a time of Pittsburgh’s renewed growth, the commons perspective urges us to revisit the city's community design legacy, and explore how it might be reinvigorated in the face of rising inequity. The event accompanies the international premier of the ifa-exhibition An Atlas of Commoning in collaboration with ARCH+ and the CMU School of Architecture on display at the Miller ICA.

Speakers include Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman, Renée Tribble, Kristin Hughes and Mary-Lou Arscott, Tobias Armborst, Antje Steinmuller, Karen Abrams, Anne-Marie Lubenau, Terri Baltimore, Stefani Danes and Christina Howell. Organized and curated by Stefan Gruber and Jonathan Kline.

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Sep
21
12:30 PM12:30

An Atlas of Commoning Site Visits to Local Projects

Designing for a Commons Transition_symposium_poster_web.jpg

SYMPOSIUM: DESIGNING FOR A COMMONS TRANSITION

Saturday, September 21 | Miller ICA

12:30-3:30 Bus Tour to Food Co-op (with option to buy lunch), Construction Junction, Center for Creative Reuse, and Community Forge. Tours and discussions with Francis Carter and Kate Safin, Mike Gable, Patrick Cooper.

Please RSVP for the bus tour as seats are limited. Students are strongly encouraged to attend.

This event is made possible through the generous support the Graham Foundation for Advanced Studies in the Fine Arts, the Frank-Ratchye STUDIO for Creative Inquiry and the Sylvia and David Steiner Lecture Series, the Carnegie Mellon University and ifa (Institut für Auslandsbeziehungen).

Against the backdrop of the escalating climate crisis, social inequity and political polarization, the growing realization that neither the government nor the market can enable even access to resources and opportunities is leading citizens the world over to take matters into their own hands, self-organizing by pooling resources and claiming their collective right to the city. The creative insights emerging from these practices of commoning offer an entry point for refuting the neoliberal mantra “there is no alternative,” and spurring the imagination of another possible world. What impact can commoning have on the bottom-up transformation of cities? And what agency do designers have in contributing to such commons transition?

The symposium at Carnegie Mellon University brings together diverse perspectives exploring the role and responsibility of architecture and urban design in the struggle for more pluralistic, radically democratic and just cities. At a time of Pittsburgh’s renewed growth, the commons perspective urges us to revisit the city's community design legacy, and explore how it might be reinvigorated in the face of rising inequity. The event accompanies the international premier of the ifa-exhibition An Atlas of Commoning in collaboration with ARCH+ and the CMU School of Architecture on display at the Miller ICA.

Speakers include Teddy Cruz and Fonna Forman, Renée Tribble, Kristin Hughes and Mary-Lou Arscott, Tobias Armborst, Antje Steinmuller, Karen Abrams, Anne-Marie Lubenau, Terri Baltimore, Stefani Danes and Christina Howell. Organized and curated by Stefan Gruber and Jonathan Kline.

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Sep
25
4:30 PM16:30

IKM Firm Visit

IKM, an architecture firm located in downtown Pittsburgh, is hosting a firm visit for both AIAS members and non-members on Wednesday 25 September from 4:30-6:00pm.

This is a great chance to network at a firm that has several CMU alumni and learn more about our profession. Please sign up on Facebook and email Joao Castro at jnobrega@andrew.cmu.edu to RSVP.

We will be leaving promptly at 4:30pm from the Margaret Morrison Rotunda and busing to the firm. The visit should last an hour and a half.

FREE AND OPEN TO ALL! Limited Spots, RSVP ASAP!

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Sep
30
4:15 PM16:15

Nostalgia for the Future: A film on Indian Modernity, Architecture, and the Making of the Indian Citizen

NOSTALGIA FOR THE FUTURE
Hindi and English, 16mm and video, Colour and B/W, 54 min, 2017

Monday 30 September | 4:15pm | Room 407 Cathedral of Learning
Q&A with filmmaker Avijit Mukul Kishore

Nostalgia for the Future is a film on Indian modernity, the making of the citizen and the architecture of the home. It looks at imaginations of homes across four examples of buildings made over the period of a century. These are Lukhshmi Vilas Palace in Baroda – the gigantic home built by a progressive monarch in the late 19th Century; Villa Shodhan in Ahmedabad – a private residence which represents the idea of domesticity within Nehruvian modernity, designed by Le Corbusier; Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad, which epitomises the Gandhian aspirations of the nation-state; and public housing in post-independence Delhi, designed by the Government of India to house refugees from Pakistan and the bureaucrats of the newly independent nation.

The film explores these spaces and imagines the bodies that were meant to inhabit them through the evocation of the cinematic and aural collective memory of a nation. It uses a mix of formats – 16mm film and digital video in both colour and black and white, along with archival footage from state propaganda films and mainstream cinema.

More information.

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Sep
30
4:15 PM16:15

Nostalgia for the Future: A film on Indian Modernity, Architecture, and the Making of the Indian Citizen

NOSTALGIA FOR THE FUTURE
Hindi and English, 16mm and video, Colour and B/W, 54 min, 2017

Monday 30 September | 4:15pm | Room 407 Cathedral of Learning
Q&A with filmmaker Avijit Mukul Kishore

Nostalgia for the Future is a film on Indian modernity, the making of the citizen and the architecture of the home. It looks at imaginations of homes across four examples of buildings made over the period of a century. These are Lukhshmi Vilas Palace in Baroda – the gigantic home built by a progressive monarch in the late 19th Century; Villa Shodhan in Ahmedabad – a private residence which represents the idea of domesticity within Nehruvian modernity, designed by Le Corbusier; Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad, which epitomises the Gandhian aspirations of the nation-state; and public housing in post-independence Delhi, designed by the Government of India to house refugees from Pakistan and the bureaucrats of the newly independent nation.

The film explores these spaces and imagines the bodies that were meant to inhabit them through the evocation of the cinematic and aural collective memory of a nation. It uses a mix of formats – 16mm film and digital video in both colour and black and white, along with archival footage from state propaganda films and mainstream cinema.

More information.

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Sep
30
4:15 PM16:15

Nostalgia for the Future: A film on Indian Modernity, Architecture, and the Making of the Indian Citizen

NOSTALGIA FOR THE FUTURE
Hindi and English, 16mm and video, Colour and B/W, 54 min, 2017

Monday 30 September | 4:15pm | Room 407 Cathedral of Learning
Q&A with filmmaker Avijit Mukul Kishore

Nostalgia for the Future is a film on Indian modernity, the making of the citizen and the architecture of the home. It looks at imaginations of homes across four examples of buildings made over the period of a century. These are Lukhshmi Vilas Palace in Baroda – the gigantic home built by a progressive monarch in the late 19th Century; Villa Shodhan in Ahmedabad – a private residence which represents the idea of domesticity within Nehruvian modernity, designed by Le Corbusier; Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad, which epitomises the Gandhian aspirations of the nation-state; and public housing in post-independence Delhi, designed by the Government of India to house refugees from Pakistan and the bureaucrats of the newly independent nation.

The film explores these spaces and imagines the bodies that were meant to inhabit them through the evocation of the cinematic and aural collective memory of a nation. It uses a mix of formats – 16mm film and digital video in both colour and black and white, along with archival footage from state propaganda films and mainstream cinema.

More information.

View Event →
Sep
30
4:15 PM16:15

Nostalgia for the Future: A film on Indian Modernity, Architecture, and the Making of the Indian Citizen

NOSTALGIA FOR THE FUTURE
Hindi and English, 16mm and video, Colour and B/W, 54 min, 2017

Monday 30 September | 4:15pm | Room 407 Cathedral of Learning
Q&A with filmmaker Avijit Mukul Kishore

Nostalgia for the Future is a film on Indian modernity, the making of the citizen and the architecture of the home. It looks at imaginations of homes across four examples of buildings made over the period of a century. These are Lukhshmi Vilas Palace in Baroda – the gigantic home built by a progressive monarch in the late 19th Century; Villa Shodhan in Ahmedabad – a private residence which represents the idea of domesticity within Nehruvian modernity, designed by Le Corbusier; Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad, which epitomises the Gandhian aspirations of the nation-state; and public housing in post-independence Delhi, designed by the Government of India to house refugees from Pakistan and the bureaucrats of the newly independent nation.

The film explores these spaces and imagines the bodies that were meant to inhabit them through the evocation of the cinematic and aural collective memory of a nation. It uses a mix of formats – 16mm film and digital video in both colour and black and white, along with archival footage from state propaganda films and mainstream cinema.

More information.

View Event →
Sep
30
4:15 PM16:15

Nostalgia for the Future: A film on Indian Modernity, Architecture, and the Making of the Indian Citizen

NOSTALGIA FOR THE FUTURE
Hindi and English, 16mm and video, Colour and B/W, 54 min, 2017

Monday 30 September | 4:15pm | Room 407 Cathedral of Learning
Q&A with filmmaker Avijit Mukul Kishore

Nostalgia for the Future is a film on Indian modernity, the making of the citizen and the architecture of the home. It looks at imaginations of homes across four examples of buildings made over the period of a century. These are Lukhshmi Vilas Palace in Baroda – the gigantic home built by a progressive monarch in the late 19th Century; Villa Shodhan in Ahmedabad – a private residence which represents the idea of domesticity within Nehruvian modernity, designed by Le Corbusier; Sabarmati Ashram in Ahmedabad, which epitomises the Gandhian aspirations of the nation-state; and public housing in post-independence Delhi, designed by the Government of India to house refugees from Pakistan and the bureaucrats of the newly independent nation.

The film explores these spaces and imagines the bodies that were meant to inhabit them through the evocation of the cinematic and aural collective memory of a nation. It uses a mix of formats – 16mm film and digital video in both colour and black and white, along with archival footage from state propaganda films and mainstream cinema.

More information.

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Oct
1
4:30 PM16:30

SAC Monthly Meeting - CFA 206A

  • CMU School of Architecture - CFA 206A (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Undergraduate Architecture Student Advisory Council (SAC) will hold a monthly meeting on Tuesday 01 October at 4:30pm in CFA 206A.


UNDERGRADUATE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT ADVISORY COUNCIL (SAC)
The Undergraduate Architecture Student Advisory Council (SAC) is the student body that represents undergraduate students within the School of Architecture. Representatives meet once a month with SAC Advisor Erica Oman and School Head Steve Lee to address the concerns of undergraduate students and develop solutions. SoA undergraduate students are invited to speak with their representatives about the changes they would like to see in their programs or facilities.

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Oct
3
5:00 PM17:00

Design Pittsburgh 2019 Awards Ceremony - New Hazlett Theatre / Nova Place

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Join AIA Pittsburgh for Design Pittsburgh 2019: Faces of Design to celebrate the places and the people who make a difference through good design.

This year, the Design Awards Ceremony will be held at the New Hazlett Theatre followed by the reception at Nova Place, both part of Allegheny Center on the North Side on Thursday, October 3rd.

SCHEDULE:

5PM – Doors open at New Hazlett Theatre
6PM – Design Awards Ceremony (New Hazlett Theatre)

6:30PM – Doors Open at Nova Place (for those skipping the awards)
7PM – Design Pittsburgh Reception

Tickets available on the AIA Pittsburgh website.

Pre-Registration closes on 9/27/19 – no refunds issued after this date.  Tickets will be available at the door

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Oct
5
to Oct 6

Doors Open Pittsburgh

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DOORS OPEN Pittsburgh believes that everyone should be able to see and experience the beauty of our city.  So we open the doors to dozens of buildings to hear the stories they tell us about our past, present, and future.

During the Doors Open Pittsburgh 2019 annual event, you will go behind-the-scenes, or have the opportunity to explore and experience INSIDE a diverse collection of iconic and newly designed buildings. Explore a vault. Stand on a theater stage. Experience an amazing view.  

More information and ticket information available at doorsopenpgh.org.

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Oct
12
11:00 AM11:00

College of Fine Arts Family Brunch - CFA Great Hall

  • Carnegie Mellon University - CFA Great Hall (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

College of Fine Arts Family Brunch

Saturday, October 12
11:00am – 1:00pm
Great Hall, College of Fine Arts

All current CFA/BXA parents and students are invited to an informal brunch with Dan Martin, Stanley and Marcia Gumberg Dean, the CFA Department school heads, the BXA Director, as well as academic advisors and a number of faculty and staff members.

Family Weekend Schedule of Events

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Oct
17
4:30 PM16:30

Behind the Columns: Celebrating the History and Legacy of the Mellon Institute

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Behind the Columns: Celebrating the History and Legacy of the Mellon Institute

For decades, companies without in-house “research and development” laboratories relied on the scientists and engineers of Pittsburgh’s Mellon Institute of Industrial Research to conduct cutting-edge scientific experimentation on their behalf. As one of the nation’s premier independent research centers since its inception in 1913, the Mellon Institute engaged the brightest scientific minds of its time to develop, test, and refine new chemical, biological, and materials science innovations on behalf of its corporate partners, in the process defining the profession of sponsored research, spinning off successful companies, and developing industry-changing technologies. Now, after nearly two years of work to organize and preserve the institutional records of this important institute, the Carnegie Mellon University Archives are pleased to officially open the collection to researchers.

In celebration of this milestone, the University Libraries will convene a round table discussion with former fellows of the Institute, faculty from the Mellon College of Science, and a historian of science and technology to discuss the Institute’s enduring legacy.

Roundtable Participants:

  • Guy Berry, Professor Emeritus, Mellon College of Science, former Senior Fellow, Mellon Institute

  • Alberto Guzman, former Associate Director, Carnegie Mellon Research Institute

  • Brian Zande, former Scientist, Carnegie Mellon Research Institute

The event will be accompanied by an exhibition in the Mellon Institute Library reading room and building tours by the former University Architect. Building Tours require a separate registration and space is limited.

Due to new Mellon Institute security procedures, photo identification will be required to enter the building for this event and all tours.

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Oct
24
10:30 AM10:30

Spark: Startups and Emerging Companies - Rangos Ballroom, CUC

  • Rangos Ballroom, 2nd Floor, Cohon University Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
Spark.png

Spark: Startups and Emerging Companies is an innovative career event designed to provide a platform for small business and early stage start-ups to engage Carnegie Mellon University students and alumni. Companies will be afforded the opportunity to network with, and recruit our students and alumni, as well as share information about their company story, mission, and/or products with all in attendance. Spark is presented in collaboration with CMU’s Swartz Center For Entrepreneurship.

More information on the CMU website.

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Oct
25
to Oct 26

CMU Homecoming Weekend

  • Carnegie Mellon University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Join us for Homecoming Weekend | October 25-26, 2019

Register Now

You are invited for a weekend of Tartan family fun at CMU’s 2019 Homecoming Weekend.

Join us for the annual Homecoming Tailgate, Saturday, October 26 and to cheer on the Tartans as they take on the Thiel College Tomcats at 1 p.m.

Homecoming highlights include:

  • Tailgate Celebration: Enjoy a delicious tailgate lunch menu, plus samples of local chocolate, in honor of National Chocolate Day.

  • KidZone: Bring the whole family for a full day of activities and fun, including a bounce house, face painting, Mad Science demos, pumpkin painting, inflatables and so much more!

  • Photo Booth: Dress up with our Halloween and Tartans gear for your selfies and group shots at this interactive, dynamic, full-length mirror.

  • Plus: S’mores station, pep rally, prizes and game-time giveaway.

Check out the full schedule to view performances, games and activities, and plan your Homecoming Weekend today!

Quick Links:

  • Bookmark the Homecoming Weekend schedule to keep up with the latest events.

  • Check out our FAQ for information on parking, attire, accessibility and other important details.

  • Watch for the weekend app details the week of Homecoming—this is THE go-to guide for all Weekend activities.

Registration closes on October 18 at 5 p.m. ET.

Register Now

Questions:

events-alumni@andrew.cmu.edu

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Nov
5
4:30 PM16:30

SAC Monthly Meeting - CFA 206A

  • CMU School of Architecture - CFA 206A (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Undergraduate Architecture Student Advisory Council (SAC) will hold a monthly meeting on Tuesday 05 November at 4:30pm in CFA 206A.


UNDERGRADUATE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT ADVISORY COUNCIL (SAC)
The Undergraduate Architecture Student Advisory Council (SAC) is the student body that represents undergraduate students within the School of Architecture. Representatives meet once a month with SAC Advisor Erica Oman and School Head Steve Lee to address the concerns of undergraduate students and develop solutions. SoA undergraduate students are invited to speak with their representatives about the changes they would like to see in their programs or facilities.

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Nov
7
to Nov 9

wats:ON 2019: NOW.

  • CMU School of Architecture (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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wats:ON 2019: NOW.

The wats:ON Festival is an interdisciplinary arts festival, bringing an eclectic and diverse range of internationally acclaimed and emerging artists and their work to Carnegie Mellon University. 

NOW. takes on the spirit of Activism, with artists and work tapping into the zeitgeist of our current climate to redirect culture.

07-08-09 November

www.watsonfestival.org

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Nov
14
6:30 PM18:30

Code Lab Lecture: Violet Whitney - MMCH A14

  • Carnegie Mellon University - MMCH A14 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
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Code Lab Lecture: Violet Whitney

The Code Lab presents a lecture by Violet Whitney from Sidewalk Labs and Columbia GSAPP in MMCH A14 on Thursday 14 November at 6:30 pm.

Violet Whitney is an Adjunct Assistant Professor at Columbia GSAPP where she teaches urban data analytics and simulation courses and Associate Director of Design at Sidewalk Labs where she leads computational design and research. She is a founding member of A-Frame, an activist organization that advocates for collaborative and equitable approaches to architectural practice. Her research focuses on how technology influences design process and urban experience. Her recent work analyzes the ways by which recommendation systems are algorithmically segregating cities, generating spatialized filter bubbles and the potential for data-driven techniques like location awareness and natural language processing to reveal unseen patterns in everyday social media, video, and images.

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Dec
3
4:30 PM16:30

SAC Monthly Meeting - CFA 206A

  • CMU School of Architecture - CFA 206A (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

The Undergraduate Architecture Student Advisory Council (SAC) will hold a monthly meeting on Tuesday 03 December at 4:30pm in CFA 206A.


UNDERGRADUATE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT ADVISORY COUNCIL (SAC)
The Undergraduate Architecture Student Advisory Council (SAC) is the student body that represents undergraduate students within the School of Architecture. Representatives meet once a month with SAC Advisor Erica Oman and School Head Steve Lee to address the concerns of undergraduate students and develop solutions. SoA undergraduate students are invited to speak with their representatives about the changes they would like to see in their programs or facilities.

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Feb
19
to Feb 20

Creative Arts Opportunities Conference (CAOC) - CUC

  • Wiegand Gymnasium, Cohon University Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
CACF logo 2018.png

Creative Arts Opportunities Conference (CAOC)
February 19-20, 2020

The CAOC is focused on connecting employers with our students interested in creative industries from the College of Fine Arts and beyond through opportunities including the Career Fair, Design Confluence,  HCII Connect, and Architecture Interchange

Find full-time, part-time, summer, or internship positions.

On the day following the CAOC, Friday 21 February, employers may conduct interviews with candidates.

More information on the CMU website.

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Sep
18
4:30 PM16:30

SoA Apparel Sale - CFA 214

  • CMU School of Architecture - CFA 214 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
SoA Apparel Sale.png

SoA Apparel Sale Wed 18 Sep @ 4:30pm in CFA 214
All SoA students are invited to the SoA Apparel Sale on Wed 18 Sep at 4:30pm in CFA 214 during the AIAS General Body Meeting. T-shirts, sweatshirts, and other SoA-branded clothing items will be available for purchase.

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Sep
18
4:30 PM16:30

What I Did This Summer - CFA 214

  • CMU School of Architecture - CFA 214 (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS
AIAS CMU_logo_square_orange.png

AIAS is hosting the event “What I Did This Summer” on Wednesday 18 September at 4:30pm in CFA 214. The event is part of the group’s Membership Month and gives students the opportunity to showcase their work from this past summer. Architect Licensing Advisor Alexis McCune Secosky will also be presenting in conjunction with Career Services on how to include your work and resume in the AXP portal.

Students interested in participating in the event must complete the form at the link below and upload a 11x17 PDF of their work samples by Sunday 15 September at 11:59pm EST.


 


 

 

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Sep
16
5:00 PM17:00

Lecture Series: Kathryn H. Anthony - Kresge Theatre

KATHRYN H. ANTHONY, PHD
ACSA DISTINGUISHED PROFESSOR
SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE, UNIVERSITY OF ILLINOIS AT URBANA-CHAMPAIGN

Defined by Design: The Surprising Power of Hidden Gender, Age, and Body Bias in Everyday Products and Places
M 16 Sep | 5:00pm | Kresge Theatre
Alan H Rider Distinguished Lecture cosponsored by the University Lecture Series
and CMU School of Design

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Sep
16
4:00 PM16:00

Rodef Shalom Kent Bloomer Sculpture Lecture

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Rodef Shalom Congregation Kent Bloomer Sculpture Lecture

Architects Kent Bloomer and Doug Cooper, SoA Adjunct Faculty, will speak about the ornamental architecture piece designed by Bloomer for the Rodef Shalom Congregation in Pittsburgh on Monday, 16 September 2019 from 4:00-6:00pm at Rodef Shalom.

In 1964, Bloomer and Dr. James Romauldi were the winners of a competition for their design in uniting the Congregation’s famed Henry Hornbostel building with the clean, horizontal design of the 1956 Freehof Hall addition. Both professors at the Carnegie Institute of Technology, now Carnegie Mellon University (CMU), they created a bas-relief with sculptural waves to catch the sunlight with an ever-changing pattern of shadows reflecting the sunlight. Bloomer, an architect, worked with Romauldi, a civil engineer, in developing a new form of concrete that eliminated the use of traditional reinforcing bars associated with concrete. The sculpture was first carved out of Styrofoam donated by the Dow Chemical Company. After cutting the blocks into 35 sections, the new product, Wirand, was applied and covered with a quartz-silicone aggregate material. Wirand, concrete mixed with millions of short, thin wire hairs is highly resistant to cracking, corrosion and other flaws and eliminates the need for conventional reinforcing bars. Originally off-white, the material presented as a sparkling, translucent surface. Over time, the ground-breaking material with its use of Wirand has maintained it integrity. What has deteriorated is the color and condition of the piece. Evaluated by a preservationist, it requires extensive work to save it for the future. The Congregation anticipates the restoration to begin Spring 2020.

Bloomer moved from Pittsburgh to Yale University in 1966. Retiring after 40 years at the school, he is currently an Adjunct Professor. He continues designing architectural ornamentation and public sculpture. Cooper is the Andrew Mellon Professor of Architecture at CMU. Combining story, history, and memory into panoramic murals, his pieces are installed throughout the world.

The event is sponsored in part by the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture. In-kind supporters include the Heinz History Center, the Pittsburgh Chapter of the American Institute of Architects, Pittsburgh History and Landmarks Foundation, and Preservation Pittsburgh and its Pittsburgh Modern Committee.

Tickets for the event are $10.00. For more information and to purchase tickets, visit the Rodef Shalom website.

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Sep
16
to Sep 18

Technical Opportunities Conference - Wiegand Gymnasium, CUC

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For more than 40 years, the Technical Opportunities Conference has been the largest job fair on Carnegie Mellon's campus, focusing specifically on technical employment. 

The TOC offers a great opportunity for companies and potential employees to make connections for both full-time and summer employment.

More information on the CMU website.

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Sep
13
11:00 AM11:00

Study Abroad Fair - Rangos Ballroom, CUC

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Are you interested in learning more about opportunities to study, work, intern, volunteer, or conduct research abroad? If so, we hope you’ll stop by our annual Study Abroad Fair on Friday, September 13th to learn about opportunities for the SemesterSummerSpring BreakWinter Break, or Academic Year -- for all majors!

Study Abroad Fair
Friday, September 13th
11:00 AM – 2:00 PM
Rangos Ballroom, Cohon Center 

Representatives from our university and departmental exchange partners, sponsored programs, and direct-enroll options will be available to answer questions and discuss different international opportunities. Many of the colleges will host tables to share information about opportunities to go abroad within your particular major. Some student organizations will also be available to answer questions about their spring break experiences abroad.

To learn more about study abroad at CMU, visit www.cmu.edu/studyabroad.

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Sep
13
10:00 AM10:00

Resume Blitz - CPDC Advising Center

Resume Blitz

Friday, September 13 | 10:00am–4:00pm
CPDC Advising Center, West Wing, 2nd Floor

Students are invited to get their resume reviewed before the Fall Job Fairs and get an early start on their internship searching process! Please bring a hard copy of your resume (if possible) for a 15-minute resume review (first come-first served).

Upcoming Fall Job Fairs:

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Sep
11
4:30 PM16:30

SoA Apparel Sale - CFA 202

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SoA Apparel Sale is Wed 11 Sep @ 4:30pm in CFA 202
All SoA students are invited to the SoA Apparel Sale on Wed 11 Sep at 4:30pm in CFA 202 Kerr Conference Room. T-shirts, sweatshirts, and other SoA-branded clothing items will be available for purchase.

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Sep
11
8:30 AM08:30

Zhiang Zhang PhD-BPD Dissertation Defense - MMCH 415 IW

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Zhiang Zhang will present the defense for the dissertation, "Whole Building Energy Model Assisted HVAC Supervisory Control via Reinforcement Learning," to obtain the PhD in Building Performance & Diagnostics (PhD-BPD) on Wednesday 11 September.

Title: “Whole Building Energy Model Assisted HVAC Supervisory Control via Reinforcement Learning”
By Zhiang Zhang, PhD-BPD Candidate

Date: Wednesday, 11 September 2019
Time: 8:30am
Location: MMCH 415 IW Large Conference Room

Advisory Committee

Khee Poh Lam, School of Architecture, Carnegie Mellon University (Chair)
Mario Berges, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University
Gianni Di Caro, School of Computer Science, Carnegie Mellon University
Adrian Chong, Department of Building, National University of Singapore


Abstract

Buildings account for a significant portion of the total energy consumption of many countries. Therefore, energy efficiency is one of the primary objectives of today's new building projects. Whole building energy model (BEM) is widely used by building designers to predict and improve the energy performance of building design. As a detailed physics-based modeling method, BEM also has the potential for developing supervisory control strategies for HVAC systems. The derived control strategies may significantly improve HVAC energy efficiency compared to the widely-used rule-based control strategies.

However, it is challenging to use BEM for HVAC control. This is because, firstly, BEM is a high-order model so that classical model-based control methods cannot be directly applied. Heuristic search algorithms, such as genetic algorithm, must be used for BEM-based control optimization. However, BEM has slow computational speed compared to other black-box or grey-box models, which limits its application for large-scale optimization problems. 

Model-free reinforcement learning (RL) is an alternative method to use BEM for HVAC control. Model-free RL is a “trial-and-error” learning method that is applicable for any complex systems. Therefore, BEM can be used as a simulator to train an RL agent offline to learn energy-efficient supervisory control strategies. However, reinforcement learning control for HVAC systems has not been adequately studied. Most existing studies are based on over-simplified HVAC systems and a limited number of experiment scenarios.

This study develops a BEM-assisted reinforcement learning control framework for HVAC supervisory control for energy efficiency. The control framework uses a design-stage BEM to “learn“ control strategies via model-free RL. Through computer simulations, the control framework is evaluated in different scenarios covering four typical commercial HVAC systems, four climates, and two building thermal mass levels. The robustness of the RL-derived control strategies is also evaluated through altering weather conditions and building operation schedules in different “perturbed” simulators. 

The control framework has achieved satisfactory control performance in a variable-air-volume (VAV) system for both cooling and heating under different climates and building thermal mass levels. Compared to the baseline rule-based control strategies, the RL-derived strategies can achieve obvious energy-saving and less setpoint notmet time. Also, the RL-derived strategies are robust to the changes in the weather conditions and the occupancy/plug-load schedules. However, the RL-derived control strategies have worse-than-baseline energy performance if the schedule of the indoor air temperature setpoint is changed. 

The control framework has also achieved reduced heating demand and improved-or-similar thermal comfort (compared to the baseline rule-based control) for a slow-response radiant heating system in all the experiment scenarios. Also, the RL-derived strategies have achieved good control performance in the perturbed simulators. However, the reward function must include a specially-designed heuristic to deal with the slow thermal response and the imperfect energy metric of this system. This indicates that the reward function design is crucial for the control performance of this control framework. 

The control performance may be poor if the reward function is over-complicated, as shown in the experiments related to a multi-chiller chilled water system. The reward function for this system consists of three complicated penalty functions corresponding to three operational constraints, including chiller cycling time, chiller partial-load-ratio, and the system supply water temperature. The RL-derived control strategies have violated the operational constraints significantly, and only achieved a limited amount of energy saving.

This thesis also studies the effects of the neural network model complexity on the control and convergence performance of reinforcement learning. It is found that a complex neural network model does not necessarily lead to better control performance than a simple neural network model. In the opposite, a complex neural network model may make the reinforcement learning hard to converge. Therefore, “deep” reinforcement learning is not necessary for HVAC control, even though it is a popular concept in recent literature. As a general guideline, this study recommends using a narrow and shallow non-linear neural network model for reinforcement learning.

In future work, the control framework should be evaluated in more scenarios, such as more types of buildings and HVAC systems, more climate zones, and so on. Besides, the framework should be validated in real-life implementation experiments. It is also necessary to conduct theoretical studies on the effects of the hyperparameters on reinforcement learning, such as the neural network model architecture, selection of the learning rate, and others. Last but not least, future work should develop an adaptive RL control method that could self-adapt to the changing operational conditions of an HVAC system.  

View dissertation here.

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Sep
3
4:30 PM16:30

SAC Monthly Meeting - CFA 206A

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The Undergraduate Architecture Student Advisory Council (SAC) will hold a monthly meeting on Tuesday 03 September at 4:30pm in CFA 206A.


UNDERGRADUATE ARCHITECTURE STUDENT ADVISORY COUNCIL (SAC)
The Undergraduate Architecture Student Advisory Council (SAC) is the student body that represents undergraduate students within the School of Architecture. Representatives meet once a month with SAC Advisor Erica Oman and School Head Steve Lee to address the concerns of undergraduate students and develop solutions. SoA undergraduate students are invited to speak with their representatives about the changes they would like to see in their programs or facilities.

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Sep
3
4:30 PM16:30

Freedom By Design Introductory Bonanza: Open to All - CFA 214

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The Freedom by Design (FBD) chapter at Carnegie Mellon School of Architecture will host their Introductory Bonanza event on Tuesday 3 September from 4:30-5:30pm in CFA 214. All are welcome to attend.

FBD is an AIAS community service program. FBD, in partnership with the National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB), uses the talents of architecture students to radically impact the lives of people in their community through modest design and construction solutions. The program embraces efforts to provide both design-build and engagement solutions to address 5 barriers: Physical · Educational · Environmental · Socio-Economic · Cultural

Freedom by Design encourages students to serve their communities by addressing issues with design solutions. FBD provides real-world experience through working with clients, learning from local licensed architects and contractors, and experiencing the practical impacts of architecture and design.

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Aug
30
9:30 AM09:30

Siliang Lu PhD-BPD Dissertation Defense - MMCH IW 415

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Siliang Lu will present the defense for her dissertation, "An interactive hybrid cooling system featuring personalized controls with personal thermal comfort and non-intrusive sensing techniques," to obtain the PhD in Building Performance & Diagnostics (PhD-BPD) on Friday 30 August.

Title: “An interactive hybrid cooling system featuring personalized controls with personal thermal comfort and non-intrusive sensing techniques”
By Siliang Lu, PhD Candidate

Date: Friday, 30 August 2019
Time: 9:30am
Location: MMCH IW 415

PhD Advisory Committee

Dr. Erica Cochran Hameen, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Chair
Dr. Omer Tugrul Karaguzel, CMU
Dr. Berangere Lartigue, Paul Sabatier University


Abstract

The Heating, Ventilation and Air-Conditioning (HVAC) system plays a key role in shaping the building’s performance. Effective and efficient HVAC operations not only achieves energy savings but also creates a more comfortable indoor environment for occupants. Moreover, compared to the private office environment, the open-plan office environment has become a trend in most office buildings since it not only creates opportunities for employees to communicate with one another and improve productivity but also reduces construction cost. However, the open-plan office building layout is also faced with problems such as interruptions from occupants and coworkers and unsatisfactory shared indoor temperature and humidity levels. Therefore, it is of great importance to develop a new paradigm for the HVAC system framework so that everyone can work under their preferred thermal environment while also achieving improved energy performance. But how can we achieve individualized thermal comfort and energy efficiency without being intrusive?

This dissertation proposes a new integrative hybrid cooling system featuring an adaptive personalized system with non-intrusive sensing techniques for open-plan office spaces. The research mainly consists of four parts:

  • Development of a personalized cooling system to create a comfortable local thermal environment automatically with non-intrusive sensing techniques and machine learning algorithms. The sensing system consists of an indoor air temperature sensor, relative humidity sensor DHT22, and an infrared temperature sensor AMG8833.

  • Quantification of the energy savings of the proposed hybrid cooling system and optimization of the cooling set-point of the ambient conditioning system to further save energy.

  • Development of a data-driven approach with CFD simulator to analyze the benefits of energy savings in a typical office space while maintaining acceptable thermal comfort with the proposed hybrid cooling system.

  • Development of an energy co-simulation with the proposed hybrid cooling system to analyze the benefits of energy savings in a typical shared office space while maintaining acceptable thermal comfort with comfort database I & II.

As a result, in terms of energy savings, five 3-hour sessions in the field study have shown that the proposed system can achieve 9.6% in HVAC energy savings on average compared with the baseline. Moreover, based on energy co-simulation models, the energy performances with the proposed hybrid cooling system could also be optimized to save HVAC electric demand power by 5.3% on average.

Additionally, in terms of thermal comfort, the performance in the field study has shown the recall scores of the thermal sensation model and satisfaction model with the data from all female subjects are 84.7% and 76.5%, respectively. Meanwhile, the recall scores of the thermal sensation and satisfaction models with the data from all male subjects are 87% and 82.5%, respectively.  Furthermore, an automated feedback collection mechanism was implemented to update occupant thermal comfort models by collecting override actions by occupants (frequency that occupants manually changed the fan speed overriding the programmed automation system). As a result of machine learning algorithms developed in this research, 60% of subjects had fewer override actions with the updated thermal sensation models compared with the initialized thermal sensation models.

Overall, the proposed hybrid cooling system featuring personalized cooling system not only optimizes energy performance, but also provides a more comfortable thermal environment in open plan office spaces.

View dissertation here.

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Aug
29
5:30 PM17:30

Eleni Katrini PhD-BPD Dissertation Defense - MMCH A11

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Eleni Katrini will present the defense for her dissertation, entitled "Creating the Everyday Commons: Spatial Patterns of Sharing Culture," to obtain the PhD in Building Performance & Diagnostics (PhD-BPD) on Thursday 29 August.

Date: Thursday, 29 August 2019
Time: 5:30pm
Location: MMCH A11


PhD Advisory Committee

Professor Vivian Loftness, School of Architecture, Chair
Dr. Cameron Tonkinwise, School of Design, University of Technology Sydney
Dr. Matthew Mehalik, Heinz School of Public Policy and Management


Title: Creating the Everyday Commons: Spatial Patterns of Sharing Culture
By: Eleni Katrini, PhD-BPD Candidate


Abstract

People in neighborhoods across the world come up with creative ways to satisfy their daily needs through sharing and collaboration, by creating alternative solutions that are resourceful and socially engaging. These creative communities based on sharing provide local solutions through a more substantial use of human, environmental, and economic resources. Since the mid-2000s, sharing and collaborative practices have received increased attention mainly because of socio-economic rapid changes within cities and the wider use of online services.

This thesis recognizes sharing culture as a potential pathway towards more inclusive and environmentally sustainable societies and identifies three main lines of inquiry based on research areas that necessitate further investigation. The first line of inquiry relates to the semantics and value of sharing culture. The rise of sharing economy has led to an ideological contestation over the meaning of sharing, placing under the same umbrella contradicting practices and thus demanding further examination. The second line of inquiry aims to investigate how sharing practices emerge and evolve over time, what challenges they face, and identify transitional pathways towards sharing culture. Finally, and most importantly, the third line of inquiry seeks to identify spatial patterns of sharing culture. Within the fields of sharing culture, collaboration, and urban commons, the relationship between space and sharing practices within urban contexts has been studied from sociological, political, and geographical perspectives. Nevertheless, there is room for further investigation from an architectural and urban design perspective, on how sharing practices emerge in urban neighborhoods and how space influences them. Specifically, this thesis aims to uncover spatial patterns on three distinct spatial scales: building, threshold, and urban. On the building scale, spatial patterns are explored regarding the relationship between the practices and the spaces they occupy; on the threshold scale, spatial patterns that relate to the interaction between the practice and the broader community; while on the urban scale, patterns of urban dynamics, land use, exposure, and local networks are investigated regarding the practices’ locale.

Along these three lines of inquiry, this dissertation offers four main contributions. The first one is a theoretical framework of sharing culture identifying: a taxonomy of how it can embed in everyday life, the value it brings to both communities and individuals, and the ways that sharing practices can amplify their impact by scaling-from-within. This framework was developed through a semi-systematic literature review on sharing, combined with findings from fieldwork, and by using Max-Neef’s model of human needs’ satisfaction.

The second contribution is building an interdisciplinary research framework to study sharing culture and reveal its spatial patterns through a situated approach, which synthesizes methods from social sciences and theories of practice, architecture, urban design and planning. Specifically, the research framework proposes a combination of qualitative analysis of participants interviews and online documents, with observations, architectural drawings, and extensive cartography to study spatial conditions across all three scales.

The third contribution is the application of the interdisciplinary research framework on sharing culture practices in London, UK, and Athens, Greece, resulting in four in-depth case studies with thick description and spatial findings across all three scales: building, threshold, and urban. The findings from the case studies are further substantiated by additional literature review on theories of social change, transition design, and sharing practices to create the fourth and last contribution of this thesis: a series of actionable spatial patterns. The spatial patterns of sharing culture showcase – both in a descriptive and propositional manner – spatial conditions that enable sharing culture. They aim to prompt designers and communities to view sharing practices through a spatial lens and help them leverage space as a catalyst for sharing culture.

View dissertation here.

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Aug
28
5:00 PM17:00

Introduction to Climate Change: New Design Challenges Lecture by Dr. Ed Rubin - CFA 214

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Introduction to Climate Change: New Design Challenges
Lecture by Dr. Ed Rubin

Wednesday 28 August | 5:00pm | CFA 214  

The School of Architecture invites you to join us for the lecture “Introduction to Climate Change: New Design Challenges” by Dr. Ed Rubin on Wednesday 28 August. All faculty, staff, and students are welcome to attend. The discussion will provide a clear understanding of what’s causing climate change, what are its implications for buildings and cities of the future, and what are some opportunities to address it. 

At Carnegie Mellon, Dr. Rubin was a founding member of the EPP department, and founding director of the Center for Energy and Environmental Studies and the Environmental Institute. He is a Fellow Member of ASME, recipient of the CMU Distinguished Professor of Engineering Award for outstanding achievements in engineering research, education and public service, and recipient of the AWMA Lyman A. Ripperton Award for distinguished achievements as an educator. He has served on advisory committees to various state and federal government agencies, including the U.S. Department of Energy, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the State of California Energy Commission, Air Resources Board and Public Utility Commission. He is a National Associate member of the National Academies and serves regularly on its boards and study committees. Among his international activities he was a coordinating lead author for the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC, co-recipient of the 2007 Nobel Peace Prize), an advisor to the Alberta Energy Ministry of Canada, and is currently a Board member of the UK CCS Research Centre. 

 

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Aug
28
3:00 PM15:00

Hetal Parekh PhD-BPD Dissertation Defense - MMCH 121

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Hetal Parekh will present the defense for her dissertation, "Policy Interventions to Catalyze Uptake of Energy Efficiency Upgrades in the US," to obtain the PhD in Building Performance & Diagnostics (PhD-BPD) on Wednesday 28 August. The Advisory Committee invites you to attend and hopes you will join them for this final step of her PhD Candidacy.

Title: “Policy Interventions to Catalyze Uptake of Energy Efficiency Upgrades in the US”
By Hetal Parekh, PhD-BPD Candidate

Date: Wednesday, 28 August 2019
Time: 3:00pm
Location: MMCH 121



 

Advisory Committee

Dr. Erica Cochran-Hameen, Carnegie Mellon University (CMU); Chair
Dr. Aurora Sharrard, University of Pittsburgh
Dr. Nora Wang, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL)
Dr. Deborah Stine, Science, Technology, and Innovation Policy Analysis & Education, LLC


Abstract

The U.S. commercial building energy retrofit market is estimated at $72 billion. If the commercial buildings pre-dating 1980 were retrofitted, energy use could be reduced by 30%, potentially resulting in $280 billion in energy savings over next 10 years. Despite this potential savings, the overall uptake of energy efficiency projects remains low in the US, due to multiple unaddressed market and non-market barriers.

This thesis is an extensive tripartite qualitative research into concerns about inaction by many commercial building decision makers and policy intervention to overcome this inaction. The first component in the thesis is a descriptive analysis identifying and analyzing the key barriers and then mapping policy tools to address each barrier. The chief finding from this analysis component is the need to overcome the knowledge barriers regarding external financing for energy retrofits. The second component is a policy analysis to evaluate existing policy mechanisms and possible alternatives. The chief finding from this analysis component is the viability of policy intervention through provision of financing decision support tools.

Building on the first two findings, the third component focuses on the formulation of a policy tool to effectively leverage resources for external financing through an aggregated, streamlined and simplified framework. Such a resource will provide decision makers with holistic support through the entire cycle - from understanding and identifying available programs, to assessing qualification and application process through its three modules:

  • Interface Module: Minimal user input and granular, simplified data output

  • Database Module: An aggregated repository of external financing program information

  • Process Module:  Input dependent calculated fields for simplified cash-flow analysis

This research provides three main contributions to the literature, each representing one of three dissertation components. This dissertation provides:

  • Policy makers detailed insights into the barriers inhibiting commercial building decision makers from investing in energy retrofits.

  • Energy efficiency program designers with an evaluation of the impact of different policy efforts to address the barriers.

  • Commercial building decision makers with access to a policy tool in the form of a ‘retrofit financing decision support’ resource that comprises of the following:

    • A Simplified Economic Assessment Information: cash-flow & benefit-cost analysis for 14 external financing vehicles to commercial building decision makers, and

    • A Comprehensive external financing database to provide granular information by geography, building type, financing source and energy conservation method.

The findings from each component of the research is further substantiated through feedback from stakeholders in the form of focus group and semi-structured interviews. Based on the stakeholder feedback, the proposed program metrics can effectively help building owners, business owners and building managers navigate through what they view as a challenging financing process for energy retrofits.

View dissertation here.

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Aug
24
12:00 PM12:00

An Atlas of Commoning Curator's Tour - Miller ICA

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An Atlas of Commoning: Spaces of Collective Production
An ifa exhibition in collaboration with ARCH+
29 June – 22 September 2019 at the Miller ICA

CURATOR’S TOURS
Saturday 27 July | 12:00-1:00pm
Saturday 24 August | 12:00-1:00pm
Saturday 21 September | 12:00-1:00pm

ABOUT THE EXHIBITION

The international premier is presented in Pittsburgh in cooperation with the Carnegie Mellon University School of Architecture and the Miller ICA.

Facebook, Airbnb, and other companies whose business models are based on the commercialization of social relationships, have transformed words like “community,” “sharing,” or “we” into empty concepts that no longer represent solidarity or a progressive social agenda, but rather form the basis for an emerging platform capitalism. This economic development is accompanied by a global political shift fueled by traditional community notions of identity and affiliation, exclusion and discrimination.

Against this background, the exhibition and publication project An Atlas of Commoning aims to recapture and redefine the open and emancipatory space of “we” as a concept. The project focuses on urban commons—here commons are to be understood as a set of practices dealing with the collective production and management of (material and immaterial) resources and spaces in general, rather than with the resources themselves, hence “commoning,” the verb, takes center stage.

Commoning is a process of dealing with differences and conflicts between the individual, the community and society. A process of spatial organization in the relations between production and reproduction, ownership and access to resources. A process that brings together solidarity networks and redefines individual and collective rights. The project questions the prevailing social and political structures and seeks new forms of collective, yet pluralistic, governance.

The starting point of the exhibition is an Atlas, a visual archive with a diverse selection of contemporary and historical case studies­. The Atlas, which is being developed by ARCH+ in collaboration with the School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University, will consist of 25 projects related to commoning.­ This initial selection is being complemented with new ones, added in collaboration with local partners as the exhibition tours from city to city. As a result, the “Atlas of Commoning” continues to grow as an open knowledge archive, producing an invaluable documentation of local grassroots projects from all over the world.

From the Atlas, the exhibition develops along three axes of investigation, each one illustrating the tension inherent in practices of sharing. The resulting chapters are: Ownership – Access, Production – Reproduction, Right – Solidarity. Artistic works open up further access to the subject. Part of the exhibition is an edition of ARCH+ magazine that delivers a broad insight into important theoretical positions and practical examples.

The Miller ICA and School of Architecture at Carnegie Mellon University host the international premiere of the ifa exhibition An Atlas of Commoning following its German premiere in Berlin this past year. The Pittsburgh edition of the exhibition includes local practices of commoning and examples of citizen-led urban regeneration. Throughout the summer, a series of workshops, discussions, and tours will provide a platform for the exchange of experiences, knowledge, and skills about gaining agency in collectively producing the environment and communities we live in. In times of cynicism, An Atlas of Commoning shows that there are boundless hopeful alternatives — alternatives that are already in the making all around us.

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